Courses

For your department, this course will be held during the pre-session and first semester. The idea behind this first part of the program is to introduce you to the kind of challenges and difficulties connected to English academic writing that you will meet in your study here and give you the chance to reflect upon and...
Credits: 2.0
TBA
Instructor: Daniel Monterescu
Credits: 2.0
This course will be an introduction to both the theory of agroecology and the practice of organic gardening techniques. Agroecology is an integrative approach to the study of agriculture that encompasses interactions between agricultural systems and their associated ecosystems, as well as the complexity of the entire...
Credits: 2.0
The course provides an overview of anthropological and ethnographic approaches to one of the great issues of our time - ethnic and national convlict.Beginning from an examination of the relevance of the sociology of nationalism, we move through a series of ethnographic examples to consider problems of political...
Instructor: Michael Stewart
Credits: 2.0
The Bible played a fundamental role in varied ways in the formation of the intellectual (and also material) culture of the Middle Ages. The “language and the logic of the Bible” shaped (to different degrees) the form of the church as an institution, her legal system, the liturgy, the sermons, iconography, theology,...
Instructor: György Geréby
Credits: 2.0
Credits: 4.0 (with tutorial), 2.0 (without tutorial)TA: Dan KnoxThis class, with its associated readings and tutorial, will introduce students to recent developments in the study of the late antique eastern Mediterranean. These developments have revised the periodisation, historiography, interpretation, and...
Instructor: Volker Menze
Credits: 4.0
The course will try to give an overview of the history of the Holy Roman Empire in the period between 900 and 1400 A.D. The course will cover the most important political events as well as the legal, social, economic and structural developments. It will also discuss the concepts of the “Holy Roman Empire”, the...
Instructor: Daniel Ziemann, Teaching Assistant: Iliana Kandzha
Credits: 4.0
The doctrine of 'class' in social theory, empirical sociology, methodology, etc. has always been fundamental in understanding complex societies – valuable thoughts concerning class had been bequeathed to us by the ancient sages of India and China.Nevertheless, the importance of class in modernity was assured by the...
Credits: 2.0
Definitions of ‘colonialism’ and ‘postcolonialism’ vary. Colonialism is sometimes understood as a specific event or experience of the past. Colonialism is also understood as an ongoing exercise of economic, military or political power by stronger states over weaker ones (‘neo-colonialism’). Still others point to...
Instructor: Prem Kumar Rajaram
Credits: 4.0
Refugees then to be produced by historical, legal, anthropological, sociological and political work as a distinct population and/or an area of study. ‘Refugees’ in all these disciplines tend to be studied as a population whose production and reproduction are of a very different order to that of ‘domestic’ populations...
Instructor: Prem Kumar Rajaram
Credits: 2.0
‘Thinking without comparison is unthinkable.’ Yet the comparative method has become something distinctive, and comparative history, politics, government, literature as well as comparative-historical sociology have been institutionalized as separate fields. The course explores these explicit comparative strategies in...
Instructor: Judit Bodnár
Credits: 4.0
Building on the Classical Sociological Theory and Classical Anthropology courses of last Fall,  this class introduces the major concepts and theories of contemporary social theory.  Contemporary social theory is understood as a set of both general theories of the social, and theories of modernity/the present. The...
Instructor: Alexandra Kowalski
Credits: 4.0
Medieval art is discussed traditionally in its stylistic or iconographical framework. However, the majority of medieval historic monuments and works of art were prepared primarily with special goals. Thus a real understanding of many of the great pieces of art cannot be imagined without the knowledge of their original...
Instructor: Béla Zsolt Szakács
Credits: 4.0
The course is offered by the Romani Studies Program at CEUThis course aims to re-envision Romani Studies through a critical lens and discuss further possibility to use new theoretical frameworks such as gender, critical race, and post-colonial theories to understand the situation of Roma in the context of changing...
Instructor: Angéla Kóczé
Credits: 2.0
The aim of this course is to offer our students a perspective on social research and social studies, especially social theory, which should – and perhaps might – inspire them to self-reflection and permanent questioning, chiefly of the conceptual framework(s) prevalent in the contemporary discourse concerning ‘the...
Credits: 2.0
This course is one of the mandatory courses in the field of methodology. It focuses on the interdisciplinary category of ‘discourse’ that conceptualizes the use of various sign systems as an integral part of social events. The major aim on the one hand is to explore how discourse as an explanatory category in...
Instructor: Erzsébet Barát
Credits: 2.0
Elective course; Media and Communication Specialisation/ConcentrationA co-taught course involving an examination of the use of video in advocacy campaigns, as well as the production of an advocacy documentary by students working in small groups.Aided by the spread in low-cost, high-quality technologies, video and...
Credits: 4.0
Economic anthropology was developed in the 1940s and ‘50s in opposition to the theoretical agenda of neoclassical economics.  We will briefly review that initial debate, and then consider more recent debates over the concept of value and the performativity of economics.  Finally, we will explore innovative studies...
Instructor: Martha Lampland
Credits: 2.0
This course is geared for students preparing for a first encounter with ethnographic fieldwork as well as for those who have already had some experience in this medium of inquiry. It provides an introduction to some of the principal methods for conducting field research in anthropology and in neighboring disciplines....
Instructor: Daniel Monterescu
Credits: 2.0
TBA
Instructor: Daniel Monterescu
Credits: 2.0
This course aims to introduce students to issues that arise in discussions pertaining to state and religion, their connections, intersections, concordances and distinctions, following a discussion of why the issue of religion-state relations arises, and under what circumstances. The approach adopted is intended to...
Instructor: Aziz Al-Azmeh
Credits: 2.0
The recent scholarly interest in communication processes and media has opened new approaches to the ways in which the so-called book religions have placed supreme authority in a certain canonic text, considered to be the unfallibly truthful message of the divinity. Sanctified by its long-duration transmission, the...
Instructor: Carsten L. Wilke
Credits: 2.0
Anthropology is the science of humans. Anthropology of religion observes and interprets the phenomenon 'religion' in social and cultural context. Historical anthropology of religion focuses on the beginnings of this approach started in the 19th century. Although the course concentrates mainly on the beginnings, we...
Instructor: András Máté-Tóth
Credits: 2.0
This course takes a broad approach to international development and global inequalities through the lens of feminist and gender theory, and within the context of globalising neoliberalism. It investigates the theory and approach of international development as well as its policy and institutions. The course considers...
Instructor: Sarah Smith
Credits: 4.0
GENERAL INTRODUCTION: This course investigates the most recent profound and unsettling global change––the so-called globalization, largely through the macro-historical lens. By reading and discussing writings from Arrigi, Cooper, Polanyi, Wallerstein, Harvey, Negri, Tsing, Schiller, and others, we trace the historical...
Instructor: Ju Li
Credits: 4.0
We will look at some of the major arguments for the existence of God, in both their historical forms, and in the more modern versions. This will include especially the ontological argument, the first cause argument, and the argument from design. Then we will move on to consider some of the properties traditionally...
Instructor: Howard Robinson
Credits: 2.0
The central role of participant observation in anthropological field work long stood as an awkward impediment to legitimating sociocultural studies of historical evidence in anthropology (with the notable exception of archaeology).  Anthropologists no longer look askance at those of us who pursue the ethnographic...
Instructor: Martha Lampland
Credits: 4.0
Knowing how to obtain and process data is a prerequisite for critical reading of sociological and anthro¬pological work, as well as part of a researcher’s key competence. This course introduces the sociologist’s and anthropologist’s toolbox, debating the potential and the pitfalls of major methodo¬logical tools. The...
Instructor: Balazs Vedres
Credits: 2.0
Short SyllabusBig Data is all around us – facebook users, records on citizens, the network of neurons in the brain, routes of migrants, impact of publications. The Data itself is neither good or evil, however, it can be used for either purposes. The availability and analysis of big data opens up enormous opportunities...
Instructor: Miklós Koren, Arieda Muço, Chrys Margaritidis, Jozsef Martin, Transparency International Hungary), Roberta Sinatra, Karoly Boroczky
Credits: 2.0
The course examines key theoretical concepts and approaches in the history of anthropology, following two parallel paths. The first path focuses on the history of the discipline itself exploring the development of historical particularism, structural functionalism and structuralism.  This path follows the early...
Instructor: Daniel Monterescu
Credits: 2.0
This course is divided into two.  Part I introduces some of the canon of “classical” sociological theories that continue to shape contemporary sociological theory and empirical research. We will read selections from Karl Marx, Max Weber, Émile Durkheim, and Georg Simmel. We will largely focus on their respective...
Instructor: Dorit Geva
Credits: 2.0
Medieval political thought is usually characterised by the opposition of Church and Empire, or the Pope and the secular ruler. The course will look at the development of these ideas from early Christianity’s conflict with the Roman Empire through the “Constantinian turn,” and then its ramifications into what is...
Instructor: György Geréby
Credits: 2.0
What is the relation of the political, and the social, to the legal? How are these relations given meaning and structured by different actors? This course aims to give students a foundational understanding of the productive and repressive capacities of law. We will study the role of law in the production and...
Instructor: Prem Kumar Rajaram
Credits: 2.0
This is a course on the ‘logic’ and politics of social inquiry. The aim of the course is to provide an introduction to the logic and methods of inquiry in the social sciences.  The course is divided into three parts.  We begin by considering the politics of social inquiry: what constitutes knowledge? How are specific...
Instructor: Prem Kumar Rajaram
Credits: 2.0
Brief introduction to the course:While probability theory describes random phenomena, mathematical statistics teaches us how to behave in the face of uncertainties, according to the famous mathematician Abraham Wald. Roughly speaking, we will learn strategies of treating randomness in everyday life. Taking this course...
Instructor: Marianna Bolla
Credits: 3.0
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Instructor: Agnieszka Pasieka
Credits: 4.0
The way science works raises deep and pressing philosophical questions. Is there a way to demarcate science from non-science? How is scientific knowledge made reliable? Is it giving us access to reality or is it merely a tool for successful prediction? The so-called “analytic” project (following Barker...
Instructor: Maria Kronfeldner
Credits: 2.0
The course provides students with a current map of the global field of heritage and of its modern history, with particular attention to its key public and private actors, organizations, laws and regulations, institutional mechanisms, main current problems, dominant and alternative practices. The general academic...
Instructor: Alexandra Kowalski
Credits: 2.0
This course explores the tangled and many-faceted relationship between modern popular culture and politics in a variety of sociohistorical and geographical settings. We will address the following topics: What is distinctive about “popular culture” and why is it thought to be political more often than “high culture”?...
Instructor: Anna Szemere
Credits: 4.0
It has been more than two decades that societies in Central and Eastern Europe started to disengage themselves from the state socialist path of modernization and to experiment with market based organization of society. It is debated if the results should be called ‘capitalism’ or ‘capitalisms’ or capitalism with...
Instructor: Violetta Zentai
Credits: 2.0
TBA
Instructor: Dorit Geva
Credits: 2.0
The course acquaints students with the principles of artistic research and is designed to expand on participants’ study by way of producing knowledge via visuality.If artistic research is – whether in its silent or verbal, declarative or procedural, implicit or explicit form – is sensual and physical, “embodied...
Instructor: Didem Pekün
Credits: 2.0
Religion has always been an important factor in shaping the attitudes and party preferences of citizens, in influencing the identities of parties and of social movements, and in structuring their alliances. This prominent political role was expected to diminish in the developed world as part of the process of...
Instructor: Zsolt Enyedi
Credits: 2.0
Questions of religion have been central to anthropology from its beginnings and remain so today when religion (re)emerges as a global force. While the early scholarship perceived religious phenomena through the skeptical lens of secular science, recent critiques brought up anthropology’s own orthodoxies and the need...
Instructor: Vlad Naumescu
Credits: 4.0
Recent research in Jewish cultural history, following post-modernist or situational perspectives, has voiced strong objections against any essential definition of Jewishness. In Judaism, with its characteristic absence of a central authority, religious and cultural norms indeed presented themselves often as matters of...
Instructor: Carsten L. Wilke
Credits: 2.0
When it emerged in the 19th century in Europe and North America, labor history study tended to combine two features together, which are the so-called “methodological nationalism” and “Euro-centralism”. This course will move beyond these two general limitations within traditional labor history study, and provide a...
Instructor: Ju Li
Credits: 4.0
SOCIAL NETWORKS SYLLABUSCNSC 6011Level:  DoctoralCourse Status:  Mandatory Full description: General scopeThe aim of this course is to give an overview of the key ideas of network science from a social science perspective.  The concept of networks has come to pervade modern society, as we routinely make use of online...
Instructor: Balazs Vedres
Credits: 4.0
Elective course, University Wide Course (UWC)In recent years there has been an explosion of work on sound by researchers in the social sciences and humanities. Highly interdisciplinary and often undertaken in cooperation with those outside academia, from musicians to professionals, the field of sound studies is...
Instructor: Cameran Ashraf, Ian Cook, Sara Svensson
Credits: 2.0

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